Author Archives: Liz

About Liz

Awards Manager at World Interiors News

WIN Loves: May Design Series

Posted on May 21, 2014 by Liz

May Design Series returned to London’s ExCeL this year, with almost 400 brands on display plus countless wonderful guest speakers holding thought-provoking seminars. WIN had a great time this year, meeting with old friends, making new contacts and seeing the amazing products on show. We were also spoiled in the press room with tasty treats and drinks, air conditioning and general kindness from the amazing press and marketing team – thanks guys! The whole space looked awesome thanks to the design expertise of Ab Rogers, who gave a great talk on the use of colour while we were there (hint – he likes it bright). To add to the fun, we bid on one of the gorgeous chairs in the Out of the Dark silent auction. All were upholstered by some fantastic bloggers using salvaged materials, so here’s hoping we win! Here’s a few quick personal snaps before we move onto our product highlights.

Gorgeous space, curated by Ab Rogers

The animated and charming Ab Rogers himself, mid-speech

Beautiful ceramics from Flux, which we blogged on earlier this year

At the iGuzzini stand, winners of last year’s WIN Awards for best Lighting Product

The only chair you’ll ever need: the Flag Halyard by Hans J. Wegner at the PP Møbler stand

Onto our favourite products at May Design. We were particularly impressed by some of the incredible lighting on display, as well as some fantastic options for storage in the home that hide your clutter but also function as a gorgeous statement piece. Fun, quirky and colourful ruled this year and we were big fans!

Playful Circus Lighting by Corinna Warm for Innermost

Pops of colour on these Zazzeri taps, also an entry into the WIN Awards this year!

Side Coffee Table from Santarossa

Bold lamps from Enigma Lighting

Shabby chic cabinets from Bluebone

Beautiful up-cycled pieces by Out of the Dark

The perfect kitchen from The Myers Touch

Stunning glass lamps by Ebb & Flow

Innovative modular shelving by Made In Ratio

We can’t wait for next year, and hope that everyone else had a great few days at the show!

The Business of Art: Interview with acrylicize

Posted on May 16, 2014 by Liz

Hard work, positivity, believing in what you do – and a little more hard work on top – can definitely get you far. The proof is in the pudding with acrylicize, a boutique art and design studio headed up by James Burke and Paul Arad. Founded in 2003 as a result of Burke’s final year University show, the company have gone from strength to strength creating bespoke artwork and schemes for a whole host of companies, including big names like Heinz, The Office Group and Deloitte. Injecting personality into offices, stadiums, public spaces and even residential homes, the pair have created an innovative and inspiring business brand, unlike anything we at WIN have seen before.

We speak to James to find out more about acrylicize and its foundations and developments, how they approach new work, favourite projects and clients and business tips for aspiring entrepreneurs…

Paul and James, Founders of acrylicize

Firstly I’d like to say thank you for taking some time out to talk to WIN about acrylicize, it’s a pleasure to feature you on our blog. acrylicize has been described as a mix between design studio and art consultancy, how would you best describe the company to those first hearing about it?

We believe art should be accessible to as many people as possible so we are on a mission to make work that sits predominately outside the gallery space. We develop custom art works, from on-off pieces to entire art schemes. The key difference is that everything is by commission and is developed to respond to the person, company, brand or space we are working with. We call it ‘Customism’. We mix art, design, interior design, architectural features and graphics all together and what comes out is acrylicize. We’re proud that we can’t be pigeonholed – it means that we are doing things differently.

James, you first met Paul at Manchester Metropolitan University some years ago. Were you both studying on the same course? And have you always been friends?

I was at Manchester Metropolitan University studying contemporary arts while Paul was studying textile management. I had started experimenting with art on acrylic as an innovative canvas and decided to pursue this idea for my final year project.  Paul was also on the cusp of graduating; we were both very inspired by the idea of doing something for ourselves, and all that energy we had at university really inspired us to go for it.

Qubic Tax, acrylicize

I can only imagine! So where did the idea of acrylicize first come about? During University, or afterwards?

acrylicize started as my degree project. I was exploring the public’s perception of contemporary and conceptual art. I wanted to develop something that could be appreciated by a wide spectrum of people who weren’t involved in the art establishment so looked at doing something new with the simple ‘picture on the wall’ concept. The idea of acrylicize was to update the traditional canvas and develop a contemporary alternative using modern materials and technology. That’s where the use of acrylic came in and with it the name acrylicize.

How did you initially set up the business? What obstacles did you face and how did you overcome these?

For my final show at university, I displayed my acrylic art pieces with ornamental price tags designed to make a comment on Art as commodity and unintentionally sold every piece. I was always interested in building a brand around the work and just because my course finished I wasn’t ready for the project to end – really it was just the beginning. Paul then jumped on board with his sales skills and we essentially worked our arses off! It was actually one of the most exciting times of the whole last 10 years as everything was so new and exciting; we believed that anything was possible and it’s on those beliefs that we moved forward.

One of the main obstacles when starting any business from scratch is not having any previous work to show for ourselves. Looking back I think it was actually one of our biggest assets as we weren’t in any way conditioned by industry practices and as such just did whatever felt right, using our instinct and intuition to help make decisions. This freedom is one of the main factors in us staying true to ourselves and creating something genuinely unique.

In terms of a challenge, one of the most important things has always been to challenge ourselves to keep creating and evolving. This is how the idea of ‘Customism’ came about, creating completely unique, narrative-driven art concepts and installations for interior spaces, be it offices, hospitals or stadia. These projects took on different forms and utilised a whole host of materials and techniques.

Interiors Group, acrylicize

You began producing unique acrylic art, and now offer bespoke art installations, commissions, architectural features, interior graphics and exhibitions for businesses. What is your process when approaching a new project and seeing it through to completion?

With each project we take on, we put a huge amount of effort into the initial research. We focus on embracing the personality of a space and try to find a story to tell. Once we have this we have the essence of the work and we can then think about execution and how the story can be brought to life. These initial idea phases are done as a group in-house with everyone pitching in ideas, thoughts and suggestions etc. We have internal ‘stretch sessions’ where we challenge each other creatively, with individual and team tasks. This can involve everything from collecting train tickets for an afternoon at Paddington Station, to each going out to the supermarket to buy Heinz beans and experimenting at home.

We operate as artists, looking for the opportunity to try something new with every new commission. From the client’s perspective, they know never to expect the same thing twice.

Do you have specific creative individuals in the industry you go to for design ideas? Or is the work mostly done in-house?

Most of the work is done in-house at our Shoreditch studio. However, one thing we’re big advocates of at acrylicize is collaboration. We have a strong theme of collaboration and love working with other people to realise ideas.

On a recent project for long-term collaborators The Office Group, we teamed up with graphic designer Alex Fowkes. We had been admiring his work for Sony Music so dropped him a line and asked him to join us for The Office Group project at 7 Stratford Place, a Georgian townhouse that had a lot of cool history that we wanted to convey through our art. Alex was up for the project so we worked together on what is one of our favourite pieces to date.

The Office Group, 7 Stratford Place, acrylicize

How do you feel your work affects office spaces? Are there better levels of productivity for example?

Art has often been confined to the gallery space and we’re really interested in the opportunity to engage with artwork in any walk of life. The workspace is one of the places you spend the longest at, so why shouldn’t you have the ability to engage with art there? We live in such a visual society and we believe art can help to stimulate people. People also appreciate the idea that who they work for has invested in the space, creating an environment that makes you happy, a bit more vibrant and a bit more energetic. That goes a long way.

Research by Dr Craig Knight, from the psychology department at the University of Exeter, has shown that staff work 15 per cent more efficiently in an office decorated with art and plants. When staff decorated their own office space, productivity increased by 30 per cent.

You also work on residential, public and healthcare projects. Is the process very similar? And which do you prefer working on?

Sometimes more professional research is required, especially when working within healthcare. It’s always really rewarding working in this sphere as you know that work is doing something to help people who are in need of feeling better.

Heinz R&D HQ, Wall 57, acrylicize

You’ve worked with a variety of brands, including some huge names – Hilton, Emirates, Harrods, BBC to name just a few. Which has been the most enjoyable for you so far?

All have been great projects. Heinz was particular awesome it was a glorious story to bring to life and a huge project for us as a company. We got to travel to the Netherlands to create a feature wall that stands in the reception of their European Innovation Centre, where all the R&D happens. It was an honour to be a part of Heinz history.

And the most challenging?

When Newcastle-based accountants Qubic Tax came to us wanting to inspire their staff, we had a challenge on our hands. Lets face it Tax can be quite a dry subject and no one particularly loves the fact that they have to pay tax. Our solution was to create a canvas of over 1,200 LEGO figures, each one representing a tax-paying vocation. We were trying to make something that is genuinely quite hard and dislikeable into something that will put a smile on your face. We looked at tax and we really wanted to humanise it as much as we could. The use of Lego was used to soften that experience and tap into the child in you.

Heathrow T3, acrylicize

What are the most valuable lessons you have learnt from setting up your own business? Any advice for aspiring young entrepreneurs?

We put endless effort into making contacts, picking up the Yellow Pages and calling everybody, absolutely anybody, who may have been remotely interested in what we were doing. It’s all about action and the very act of doing something as simple as speaking to people has a knock-on effect.

For young entrepreneurs who are finding their feet, starting their own businesses, two principal themes have been very successful to us personally. The first one is a positive step. Take a step somewhere even if you are not sure which direction you’re going in. Don’t worry about that. The important thing is to be proactive, get off the couch and just take the first step to start you on your path and journey.

The second theme is belief. Have belief in yourself. Have belief in what you are offering and have belief in the people you are working with. Positive energy and belief are the two key drivers that we embrace and push forward every day.

Wembley Stadium , acrylicize

You seem to be constantly evolving and developing, so what is next for acrylicize?

We are really interested in the idea of community and collaboration and bridging the gap between great creative talent and opportunities to make a living doing what you love. We have some big plans in the department. On top of this we are developing some great projects as part of acrylicize and are about to release two short films about our recent installations that have just been completed.

And when you’re not busy installing monsters into the Headquarters of Mind Candy or injecting some fun into a tax office with Lego pieces, what else do you enjoy doing? Where would we find you on a typical weekend?

Paul and I both have young children so we are spending a lot of time with all the amazing things that come with that. I am also a keen drummer and graffiti artist and like to indulge in both these areas regularly. It’s all about balance and doing lots of what you enjoy.

Final question – what is your own office space like – just curious!

We’ve got a great space in Shoreditch, just off Redchurch Street. It’s got relics of all our projects and is a really bright, open space with huge floor to ceiling windows. We moved east two years ago, from our original studio in Harrow. The team had grown and we were keen to soak up the creativity of the melting pot that is east London at the current time. The energy is great, it’s a vibrant part of town filled with artists, designers and people doing their thing, creating a constantly evolving landscape on an almost daily basis. It suits what we do very well and we wanted to leave our mark.

The Office Group, 7 Stratford Place, acrylicize

Wheat is Wheat is… Wheat?

Posted on May 13, 2014 by Liz

It is clear that artist and designer Peddy Mergui has a desire to challenge the status quo in his creations, partly stemming from growing up amongst various cultures, in Morocco, Israel and Japan. He’s worked on a multitude of advertising campaigns and has helped to create brands worldwide, which only makes his latest venture all the more interesting.

Flour by Prada, Peddy Mergui

Wheat is Wheat is Wheat is Mergui’s first solo exhibition, about to open in San Francisco. In this series, he has taken the packaging of basic commodities (eggs, milk, butter, oil) and introduced high end brand names (think Gucci and Versace) into their labelling, providing them with a new identifying element. The resulting products are definitely food for thought as it were. Both individually and collectively, the striking images within the exhibition allow for open dialogue on consumer culture, ethical boundaries and the design world.

The connection between packaging and products is recognisable in modern culture, although not often logical. What would it mean to eat Tiffany&Co yoghurt or to make your morning coffee with Cartier coffee beans? Mergui’s pairings are playful and even amusing; drawing the viewer in and simultaneously challenging them with a provocative undertone. What kind of challenges do designers face in terms of economic interest versus integrity? As consumers, do we inadvertently support unethical conditions? Do we perceive certain brands as meaning we belong to a certain type of group, as a certain type of person?

Salami by Louis Vuitton, Peddy Mergui

Mergui found: “The interesting part is that most viewers tell me they see something they want in the exhibition. Why? Not for the playfulness of it, but for what it makes them feel. The Seduction presents us with a mirror to ourselves.”

iMilk by Apple, Peddy Mergui

Wheat is Wheat is Wheat definitely poses more questions than it answers and this is the most enjoyable aspect of the exhibition. It is a truly eye opening series that will inspire debate – and make you question your purchases on your next shopping trip!

Eggs by Versace, Peddy Mergui

What’s on at The Saatchi

Posted on May 8, 2014 by Liz

We truly love The Saatchi Gallery here at WIN – it’s a spectacular venue that shares thought provoking and inspiring contemporary art with the world, a global meeting place for all who visit and accessible for anyone and everyone as all exhibitions are free! We are extremely lucky as it is also where we will be holding our World Interiors News Annual Awards Dinner later this year, following the success of last year’s event (we can’t wait!). So what’s been going on at The Saatchi so far this year?

Kostas Agiannitis – Lifestyle. Image courtesy of the Saatchi Gallery

Firstly, an exciting partnership with Google+ has allowed for motion photography to be introduced as an art form for everyone. As technology continues to develop, photographers from all backgrounds are embracing new ways to tell their stories. Motion photography is a new trend that used to require special tools and know-how, but Google+ have simplified the process, allowing users to effortlessly and automatically animate a series of still photographs and turn them in to motion photography.

Matthew Clarke – Night. Image courtesy of the Saatchi Gallery

In recognition of the exciting potential of this new technology came the Motion Photography Prize, inviting photographers all over the world to celebrate this new creative art form, the first global entry competition of its kind. This was judged by an amazing panel of forward-thinkers including film director Baz Luhrmann and artists Shezad Dawood and Cindy Sherman. The competition was tough, with over 4,000 entries from 52 countries, but an overall winner was recently announced. Christina Rinaldi, with her black and white motion photograph of a New York window cleaner, has won a once-in-a-lifetime trip with a photographer or film-maker as her mentor. Her entry, along with those of the five other finalists, plus the shortlist of 54 motion photographs is now on exhibition at The Saatchi Gallery until 24 May and will also be featured online at Saatchi Art.

Christina Rinaldi – Urban. Image courtesy of the Saatchi Gallery

Another fantastic exhibition that is currently on display until 31 August, is Pangaea: New Art From Africa and Latin America. Taking its title from the prehistoric landmass that conjoined Africa and Latin America, this major survey reunites the two former sister continents by bringing together the work of 16 of their contemporary artists. The exhibition celebrates and explores the parallels between their distinctly diverse cultures and creative practices, as they begin to receive recognition in the increasingly globalised art world.

Aboudia – Enfants dans la rue 2, 2013. © Aboudia, 2013. Image courtesy of the Saatchi Gallery

The artists in Pangaea: New Art From Africa and Latin America, respond to present day complexities in diverse and innovative ways. Years of colonial rule, rapid urban expansion, migration and political and economic unrest remain subjects for many of the artists whose reflections on the richness of their environment translate into an intense visual experience. The full scope of work on display in this exhibition, which includes new painting, photography, installation and sculpture, encapsulates this sense of diversity – a bubbling energy surfacing in the two great continents that were once Pangaea.

Rafael Gómezbarros – Casa Tomada, 2013. © Sam Drake, 2014. Image courtesy of the Saatchi Gallery.

Pangaea: New Art From Africa and Latin America features work by Aboudia, Leonce Agbodjélou, Fredy Alzate, Antonio Malta Campos, Rafael Gómezbarros, David Koloane, José Lerma, Mário Macilau, Ibrahim Mahama, Dillon Marsh, Jose Carlos Martinat, Vincent Michea, Oscar Murillo, Alejandra Prieto Boris Nzebo, Christian Rosa. A stand out piece is definitely Gómezbarros’ Casa Tomada, with giant ants that address issues of diaspora and internal displacement suffered in Colombia for several decades due to the armed conflict wreaking havoc on the country. Aboudia’s vast canvases are also striking, occupied by a multitude of characters displaying menacing weapons, a record of the sudden escalation of violence following electoral chaos in the city of Abidjan in 2011.

Vincent Michea – Before the Bigger Splash, 2012. © Vincent Michea, 2012. Image courtesy of the Saatchi Gallery.

With all this on and more, it’s quite simple really – get yourself down to The Saatchi as soon as you can to experience some amazing art!

Milan Moments

Posted on April 15, 2014 by Liz

Our Editor has returned from Milan suitably tired but with multiple stories, contacts, photos, bundles of press kits and of course feeling hugely inspired by the gorgeous and innovative designs exhibited this year. It’s impossible not to feel slightly overwhelmed with appreciation for such varied and widespread talent! Of course I could ramble on about the brilliance of the furniture, accessories and lighting we’ve seen for hours, but as they say, a picture paints a thousand words and so here are some 20,000 on the highlights of Salone del Mobile. First up, some of our Editor’s personal photos during her busy week.

Moooi’s ‘Unexpected Welcome’ at Via Savona 56

Inga Sempé’s Ruché armchair for Ligne Roset at France Design by VIA

North Light Series by Eva Marguerre and Marcel Besau for e15

Exploring EDIT by designjunction

Ed Richardson, Founder of Modus in their Lily Chair designed by Michael Sodeau

Happy crowds discussing design over Prosecco in the courtyard at EDIT by designjunction

Moooi’s ‘Unexpected Welcome’ at Via Savona 56

Canvas Chair by YOY for Innermost at EDIT by designjunction, also featured in a previous blog here

Grillage Chair by Francois Azambourg for Ligne Roset at France Design by VIA

Lampyridae Lamp Series by Monica Correia at EDIT by designjunction

Onto our top product picks. Having delved through an array of intriguing press kits, which also ended up in us painting our nails ‘Knoll Red’ (a great shade if you’re interested!), the team at WIN have chosen just a small selection of our favourite designs from Milan. The trends tend towards simple, clean lines, pops of bright colour, bringing outdoor furniture indoors and vice versa, and use of playful prints and patterns. Definitely perfect for the approaching summer months!

SwingMe and SwingUs, Outdoor Floating Living Room Collection by Daniel Pouzet for DEDON

Taffeta Sofa by Alvin Tjitrowirjo for Moooi

The Washington Collection by David Adjaye for Knoll, his first furniture collection. Photo by Dorothy Hong

Foundry Floor Lamp by Nat Cheshire for Resident

Patch di Fiammati collection by Missoni Home

Babel drinks cabinet by Roberto Lazzeroni for Poltrona Frau

Phoenix Kitchen by CR&S Varenna for Poliform

Bassotti Sideboards by Marcel Wanders for Moooi

Poke stool by Kyuhyung Cho for Innermost

Hope you enjoy these images and products as much as we do! We’re also looking forward to being similarly inspired by the entries into the Lighting Projects, Lighting Products, Furniture and Interior Accessories Categories of our World Interiors News Awards 2014. There’s just six weeks left before our close, so if you’d like to enter or just want some more information about the Awards, just email!

Milan, mischer’traxler & The Young Talent Award

Posted on April 9, 2014 by Liz

The WAN and WIN editors-in-chief are at the fabulous Salone del Mobile in Milan this week, whizzing their way around hundreds of stalls and tweeting images of some of their favourite designs, at which the team are staring in pure admiration and awe. While they report live from the venue, I thought it would be interesting to focus on some lesser known designers also at the infamous design week, brought to our attention by BE OPEN.

Benjamin Graindorge, France. Shortlisted.

BE OPEN is a global initiative to foster creativity and innovation, a think tank whose mission is to promote people and ideas today to build solutions for tomorrow. It is a cultural and social initiative founded by the Russian philanthropist, businesswoman and entrepreneur Yelena Baturina, with the support of an amazing international team. It was in fact launched during Milan Design Week 2012, with the goal of becoming a bridge between the great minds of our time – philosophers, sociologists, designers, architects, artists, writers, businessmen and opinion leaders – and the promising new minds of the younger generation.

Kwangho Lee, South Korea. Shortlisted.

BE OPEN develops its works through exhibitions, events and panel discussions in the world’s leading design capitals. Naturally, they decided to announce the first winner of their new annual prize, The Young Talent Award, at a packed awards ceremony at the start of this year’s Milan Design Week. mischer’traxler was selected from a shortlist of ten candidates, from an original long list of thirty-seven, put forward by a leading international design industry jury. This jury was an all-star cast from the design world, including Giulio Cappellini, Art Director of Cappellini, Sofia Lagerkvist of design trio Front, and Jay Osgerby of Barber & Osgerby, who designed the Austrian duo’s unique egg trophy prize, a symbol of nascent talent ready to hatch.

Katharina Mischer and Thomas Traxler of Studio mischer’traxler, Austria. Winners of The Young Talent Award.

The jury said of their selection: “The work of the ten shortlisted candidates is of exceptional quality, but we felt that mischer’traxler’s methods best reflect the spirit of this new, important design prize. Matching experimental research and vanguard attitudes with industrial production, they clearly indicate how much further manufacturing can be developed from where it is now. Their talent for introducing creative interaction into everyday objects and humanising every aspect of design reflects their incredible ability to synthesise the future of design.”

The criteria for this prize, and indeed the award itself, are unique: the selection is made on the basis of potential, rather than work achieved. As well as their trophy, mischer’traxler win €24,000 to support their living expenses for a year. This is so that they can continue to work at their own pace, without any obligation to create new products or exhibit their work. The Young Talent Award is, like BE OPEN, changing how people see the design world, providing an opportunity for learning, education and development that will spur on creativity and innovation.

Dennis Parren, Netherlands. Winner of Yelena Baturina prize.

There was also a second winner at the awards ceremony, with Dennis Parren selected as the Yelena Baturina prize-winner. His trophy, a replica dinosaur egg, was created especially by Front Design. Baturina herself chose Parren from the shortlist, due to her belief in his business potential. His design specifically ‘tapped into a very important trend for our time’ of people as ‘global nomads’. Moreover, there will be a third prize known as the Web Choice award for another talented young designer – you have until 17 May to vote online for your favourite, so definitely get involved here!

Elie Ahovi, France. Shortlisted.

We’re looking forward to hearing more inspirational stories like this when everyone gets back from Milan – be sure to check our news site for product exclusives next week!

One Cool Dude!

Posted on April 3, 2014 by Liz

Now I must admit, Markus Johansson is a favourite of the WIN team – I’m often receiving emails from my Editor and various colleagues about his latest products and with good reason. The Swedish designer has been making waves in the design world since graduating from HDK in 2011, collaborating with both Swedish and international companies. He also owns the Markus Johansson Design Studio, his latest piece being one of his own projects.

Hello Dude, Mark Johansson

Hello Dude is a lamp, an extremely fun lamp at that. Not only is it fun, it is practical. Johansson says that he ‘got fascinated with the idea of a large screw which will let you regulate the light, either flood your space or dim it’. The large screw became a little dude with a cap. Replacing the dude’s head with a light means that when he raises his cap, this light shines through the room he’s in. He can also provide softer lighting, just screw his cap back down.

Hello Dude, Mark Johansson

If the cap is askew, the light goes where the dude looks. This gives the dude his character, with changed expressions he provides transformed luminosities. He’s also extremely accommodating with no fixed construction; by positioning his cap the user is able to regulate both the intensity of the light and its direction. The cap can be turned up and down and set in various angles with a multi-axis arm that revolves around a ball. Smart, simple and cool. Hence why he’s such a dude!

Hello Dude, Mark Johansson

The lamp is made from a hard and durable material akin to steel and glass and comes lacquered in three different colours: black, a greyish brown and a pastel yellow. I can definitely see these little guys lighting up bedrooms, cheering up office desks and animating entranceways. Check out this and Johansson’s other pieces at Salone del Mobile Milano next week, WIN will hopefully see you there!

An Artist’s Impression: Loukas Morley

Posted on March 28, 2014 by Liz

Loukas Morley is a Cambridge based artist and designer who studied at Cambridge and the Newport School of Art in South Wales.

Azure Pink, 90×90 (spirit based pigment on canvas)

Loukas is extremely adventurous in his work and, not being bound by any one medium, could be described as an artist, furniture maker and even landscape gardener.

His strongest designs can be distinctly seen within his paintings, which we love. These grand canvases, many of which are over 1m2, would make the perfect finishing touch for any interior design scheme and could be easily placed as a feature in any room of the house. What is obviously distinct is his incredible use of colour, he merges tones in swirling patterns with impressive effects; his paintings have a great presence in large open spaces.

Wild Flowers From My Balcony, 100×100 (spirit based pigment on canvas)

Diptych I, 70×70 (spirit based pigment on canvas)

Summer Reverie, 70×70 (spirit based pigment on aluminium)

Seeing great value and beauty in disregarded objects, Loukas also rescues and re-uses materials that would have been otherwise thrown away within his work. He offers a somewhat poetic response to human wastefulness. This upcycling is very evident in his furniture, most of which has been constructed from reclaimed wood and metal. Loukas has designed and made tables, chairs, stools, and even bespoke storage for private clients.

Protoype Side Table (in production)

Reversible cedar table top on trestle legs, 2006, 80x250cm

The team at WIN are now coveting a piece to hang on the wall in our office – and we can’t wait to see what’s next from this talented artist!


The Early Birds Catch our Attention

Posted on March 21, 2014 by Liz

Our Early Bird Registration for this year’s World Interiors News Awards has now officially closed, and what an amazing response! The team at WIN have been inundated with remarkable projects across all interiors categories; it’s been an absolute delight working with everyone to feature their submissions and we’re excited to see more over the coming months. With entries from Australia, Mexico, Norway, Dubai, Bulgaria, Japan, Ecuador, Canada, USA, UK, Thailand, Ukraine, Poland, Brazil and every other location you could think of, we’ve extremely happy to have connected with so many talented architects and designers worldwide to showcase their work.

We’ve also been busy securing some fabulous jury members who will reviewing the designs this year, including Conrad Smith, Managing Director of ReardonSmith, Nick Jones, Founder and CEO of Soho House, Fiona Livingston, Co-Founder and Director of Studiofibre and Guzmán de Yarza Blache, Master Director in workspace design at the IE School of Architecture and Design. Additionally, the team have been working hard to put together special editions of our INSIDE newsletter, each one based around an Awards Category in order to present the entries so far, giving them even more of the exposure they deserve.

There is plenty of time left to enter into this year’s awards with our overall deadline of 06 June still over two months away. Below is a snapshot of just some of the entries we’ve received, we hope it’ll inspire you to get involved! For further information on the Awards, please don’t hesitate to contact me at liz.naven@worldinteriorsnews.com or on +44 (0)1273 201 117

Café Ki, Tokyo, Japan by id. Entry into Restaurant Category.

El Magatzem de la Bodegueta, Barcelona, Spain by Pilar Líbano Studio. Entry into Bars Category.

T2 Headquarters, Melbourne, Australia by Landini Associates. Entry into Workspace Interiors Category.

Nanchang Insun International Cinema, Nanchang, China by One Plus Partnership Limited. Entry into Leisure or Entertainment Venues Category.

57C Lambert Road, London, United Kingdom by Karsten Weiss. Entry into Residential Interiors Category.

Lakewood Cemetery Garden Mausoleum, Minneapolis, United States by HGA Architects and Engineers. Entry into Public Sector Category.

St. Cecilia, Atlanta, United States by Meyer Davis Studio Inc. Entry into Restaurants Category.

Barrancas House, Mexico City, Mexico by EZEQUIELFARCA architecture & design. Entry into Residential Interiors Category.

The Barbarian Group, New York, United States by Clive Wilkinson Architects. Entry into Workspace Interiors Category.

Raheen Library, Melbourne, Australia by Woods Bagot. Entry into Public Sector Category.

Delfina Foundation, London, United Kingdom by Studio Octopi. Entry into Museum or Exhibition Spaces Category.

King + Duke, Atlanta, United States by Meyer Davis Studio Inc. Entry into Restaurants Category.

One Hot Yoga Studio, Melbourne, Australia by Robert Mills Architect. Entry into Leisure or Entertainment Venues Category.

Restaurant & Bar Nazdrowje, Stockholm, Sweden by Design by Richard Lindvall. Entry into Restaurants Category.

The Art of the Chair

Posted on March 6, 2014 by Liz

Photo Credit Yasuko Furukawa

Introducing YOY, a Tokyo based design studio represented by Naoki Ono and Yuki Yamamoto. Naoki is a graduate of architectural design from the Kyoto Institute of Technology, working as a spatial designer, while Yuki is a product designer who graduated in industrial design at Kanazawa College of Art. The pair joined forces in 2011, forming YOY with the intention of creating a new story between space and objects. Canvas is their latest story, or rather illustration come to life.

Photo Credit Yasuko Furukawa

At first glance, this is a simple canvas with a quirky print – it would be a great piece in any home, hung on the wall in an elegant dining room or modern bedroom. The two dimensional drawing of either a chair or sofa is definitely something that would be desirable to many of us on its own. Of course, coming from YOY, it has a twist. Yes it’s a canvas and yes it can be hung up to admire, but also, it can be leant against the wall and sat on. The drawing of a chair is also in fact a chair, you can essentially sit in your purchased artwork. Certainly useful if you’ve run out of seats and guests are over!

Photo Credit Yasuko Furukawa

Now to the technical part before you run to your nearest prized art piece, set it against the wall and fall through it. YOY’s canvas chairs have a frame made of wood and aluminium and are covered by an elastic fabric which is printed with the texture of a canvas and the chair or sofa drawing. It is this elasticated fabric that moves to hold the individual’s weight, allowing it to become a functioning seat. YOY perceive it is a canvas shaped chair with a drawing of a chair. What do you think chair or art? Or both? Either way, it’s a unique and stylish piece that will definitely get people talking – and sitting!

Photo Credit Yasuko Furukawa