Category Archives: Art

Conran and Partners Celebrate the Centenary of the Iconic Cola Bottle

Posted on March 3, 2015 by Annalisa

Conran and Partners recently collaborated with Coca-Cola to honour the 100th anniversary of the iconic contour bottle. They created a striking installation at the High Museum of Art, Atlanta, featuring a unique ribbon interpretation of the bottle created by 3D printing methods with the brand Shapeways.

Over 500 of these ribbon bottles were hung from the ceiling to create a stunning display that not only commemorated the global brand but also exists as a visual art piece in its own right.

Since its creation in 1915, the Coca-Cola contour bottle has become a design symbol of the 20th Century and has had an outstanding impact on visual art and culture. To celebrate 100 years since its inception, the High Museum of Art in Atlanta is exploring the bottle’s iconic design and creative legacy.

‘The Coca-Cola Bottle: An American Icon at 100’ exhibition features more than 100 objects, including works of art by Andy Warhol, inspired photographs, original design illustrations and historical artifacts.

Susan Gunn commissioned to paint ‘low carbon’ frieze for The Enterprise Centre

Posted on December 3, 2014 by Liz

Internationally acclaimed artist Susan Gunn has been chosen to create her signature art for the £11.6m ambitious and ground-breaking low carbon building project that is The Enterprise Centre at the University of East Anglia in Norwich. The painting will span the length of the lecture theatre entrance wall creating a dramatic and evocative centrepiece.

An Alumni of Norwich University of the Arts, Susan received international recognition when she was awarded the Sovereign European Art Prize in 2006. Her work has been exhibited widely and can be found in public and private collections around the world. Gunn uses natural earth pigments, a traditional binder and natural beeswax together with regionally sourced linseed oil to provoke fractured surfaces that develop during the drying process.

Gunn’s works of art are stunning options for designers working on hotels, homes, offices and all other manner of developments to consider. Her painting for The Enterprise Centre will be made in panels that hang together as a frieze, approximately 20m long. Over the eleven panels there will be sequences of 11 pigments that form the layout, incorporating a colour scheme to echo the natural surroundings.

Dark Matter I

Gunn comments: “This is a fantastic project on which to collaborate with the developers of The Enterprise Centre, the Adapt Low Carbon Group and architectural firm, Architype. The innovative concept and sustainable materials used in the building dovetail perfectly with my approach to painting… I was particularly inspired by the offset vertical lines of the trees visible in the atrium from the Memorial Gardens and conservation site in the grounds of the building; the vertical divisions in the painting aim to accentuate these and bring an order to the organic fractures evident in the surface.”

Ground Formation I

The Enterprise Centre, which is the UK’s greenest commercial building, will open in spring 2015. Gunn’s commission is sponsored by Turquoise International Ltd.

Consumerism & Natural Urges: Lego vs Ikea

Posted on September 12, 2014 by Liz

The Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery in Sydney, Australia recently presented its first exhibition with collaborative artists Claire Healy and Sean Cordeiro. Venereal Architecture investigates the spaces humans inhabit and the methods we use to attempt to control our environments and consequently control the natural world.

Venereal Architecture, Photos courtesy of the artists and Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney

Healy and Cordeiro lead a nomadic lifestyle which has become the foundation of their work. They draw upon elements of travel to inform their practice as artists; packing, unpacking, accumulation, storage, freight. Their latest series particularly emphasises these themes, with Lego and Ikea furniture utilised to create the artists’ sculptures. Both brands are recognised as being functional and buildable, assembled by children and adults alike to create their ideal end-product.

‘Downstairs Dining Room – Octopus’, Photos courtesy of the artists and Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney

The artists explain: “Lego and Ikea furniture are very similar in a sense: they are both objects of aspiration that require assembly. Lego, which we grew up with, represents the dreams and fantasies of a child; Ikea furniture, which has become so ubiquitous, represents the dreams and fantasies of an adult. By meshing these two objects together we can think about the gap between our fantastic dreams and our banal longings. Both products represent destruction and re-construction, which are concerns we revisit continually within our practice.”

‘Bedroom 3, Baby’s Room – Lion’, Photos courtesy of the artists and Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney

In the exhibition, Lego animals are entwined within the furniture with unexpected and startling results. A snake wriggles through coat hooks while a lion crashes through a baby changing station and a turtle crawls under a table.

‘Hallway / Rear Entrance – Snake’, Photos courtesy of the artists and Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney

Healy and Cordeiro comment: “The works represent our sublimated animal urges expressed through shopping… We believe that the combination of Ikea and sex is palpable. Visiting an Ikea showroom is a serious group-nesting experience: like giant bower birds, we carry around our blue object bag in the vague hope of getting laid if we curate the right combination of objects into our love-nests. The consumer experience must be the result of some natural urge gone slightly wrong”.

Venereal Architecture, Photos courtesy of the artists and Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney

Soho House Chicago

Posted on August 15, 2014 by Liz

Let’s just start off by saying that WIN simply adore Soho House. Our Editor has been a member of every House for many years and we hold the judging for our Awards each July at the original club on Greek Street – in fact this year Founder and CEO Nick Jones joined the panel judging the Hotel Interiors Category. Our team are eternally impressed by the superb service from delightful staff members, the inviting interiors with an enviable selection of eclectic furnishings and of course the perfectly crafted coffees that see us through our busy days. We’re also partial to their Eggs Benedict in the morning!

Soho House Chicago

Pizza East, Soho House Chicago

Unsurprisingly, the group has expanded rapidly over the years, with multiple Houses opening up across Europe and North America. Their portfolio also includes cinemas, hotels, Cowshed spa and salons and 15 public restaurants. This week marks the group’s fifth opening in North America, an exciting development which we are delighted to share with you. Presenting Soho House Chicago.

Screening Room, Soho House Chicago

Soho House Chicago

Housed in a six storey warehouse dating back to 1907, the club is inspired by and celebrates its bustling city setting, with many of the building’s original elements repurposed to capture distinct moments in Chicago’s history. Other features have been left untouched, such as the ornamented entrance and large, open floor plans with exposed concrete structures. Additionally, curators for Soho House, Jonny Yeo and Francesca Gavin, collaborated with Chicago based artists to seamlessly weave local artwork throughout the property in the group’s signature mismatched style.

Soho House Chicago

Soho House Chicago

There are 40 guestrooms in Soho House Chicago, all decked out with uniquely sourced furniture and art pieces. They contain an aura of luxury that pervades every storey of the club: from the second floor with fully outfitted fitness centre and boxing ring fashioned by Chicago’s famous Horween Leather Company to the fourth with its cosy 40 seat screening room and the Club Floor on level five with drawing room, bar, house kitchen and grill.

Fitness Centre, Soho House Chicago

The Allis, Soho House Chicago

To top everything off, at the building’s highest point there is a glass enclosed rooftop bar and kitchen and outdoor deck with 80 ft swimming pool. We’re already imagining ourselves sipping a cocktail poolside, gazing at the stunning architecture on the horizon.

Soho House Chicago

Soho House Chicago

Non-members are also able to indulge themselves at Soho House Chicago, enjoying delectable delights from the kitchens of public-facing restaurants Pizza East and Chicken Shop or a well-edited selection of wine and craft beers from Allis Bar. The Cowshed spa and salon is likewise open to the public, ready to pamper with a fine selection of thoughtful scents, botanical ingredients and herbal remedies.

Chicken Shop, Soho House Chicago

Cowshed spa and salon, Soho House Chicago

The photos speak for themselves, it seems all that’s left to do is book our flights and visit our Chicago based ‘home away from home’.

Soho House Chicago

Soho House Chicago

Soho House Chicago

Chicken Shop, Soho House Chicago

Screening Room, Soho House Chicago

Soho House Chicago

Inspired by Nature, Created by Conran

Posted on June 3, 2014 by Liz

Design giants Conran and Partners have surprised and delighted the WIN team with their latest venture. Known by all for their outstanding design portfolio, which encompasses both architecture and interiors, branding and products, we’re sure many of you have fantasised about members of their talented team coming to work their magic on your homes, shops, local restaurants and businesses. Paint by Conran will bring you one stop closer to that dream.

Paint by Conran

Drawing on 50 years of experience in designing for the home, Conran and Partners have created a range of interior paints, launched with a tremendous 96 colours, all inspired by British plants and landscapes. Teaming up with them is esteemed British paint manufacturer Master Paintmakers, who have been handcrafting paint in the UK for over 150 years. This supreme partnership has utilised their technical know-how and Conran’s design expertise to create a paint range that is both practical and beautiful.

Paint by Conran

The branding too, is absolutely gorgeous – care has been put into absolutely every element of the paint and the overall buying experience. Delicate hand-painted swatch cards are available as well as elegant tester pots that remind one of artist’s paints, packaging is a simple white with charming and unique watercolour motif – a different image for each collection (Highland, Cottage Garden, Kitchen Garden, Orchard and Harvest.) Each purchase is even delivered with a thank you card that doubles as a colour matching card when shopping for complementary items, and with a Paint by Conran Partner card that gives the holder special offers and exclusive benefits!

Paint by Conran

This range does it all, providing colours for every room in the house, personalised service and care for each individual customer. With quintessential British countryside appeal, Conran can help you bring the beauty of nature indoors. We can’t wait to get our hands on these paints, and get them onto our walls this summer!

The Business of Art: Interview with acrylicize

Posted on May 16, 2014 by Liz

Hard work, positivity, believing in what you do – and a little more hard work on top – can definitely get you far. The proof is in the pudding with acrylicize, a boutique art and design studio headed up by James Burke and Paul Arad. Founded in 2003 as a result of Burke’s final year University show, the company have gone from strength to strength creating bespoke artwork and schemes for a whole host of companies, including big names like Heinz, The Office Group and Deloitte. Injecting personality into offices, stadiums, public spaces and even residential homes, the pair have created an innovative and inspiring business brand, unlike anything we at WIN have seen before.

We speak to James to find out more about acrylicize and its foundations and developments, how they approach new work, favourite projects and clients and business tips for aspiring entrepreneurs…

Paul and James, Founders of acrylicize

Firstly I’d like to say thank you for taking some time out to talk to WIN about acrylicize, it’s a pleasure to feature you on our blog. acrylicize has been described as a mix between design studio and art consultancy, how would you best describe the company to those first hearing about it?

We believe art should be accessible to as many people as possible so we are on a mission to make work that sits predominately outside the gallery space. We develop custom art works, from on-off pieces to entire art schemes. The key difference is that everything is by commission and is developed to respond to the person, company, brand or space we are working with. We call it ‘Customism’. We mix art, design, interior design, architectural features and graphics all together and what comes out is acrylicize. We’re proud that we can’t be pigeonholed – it means that we are doing things differently.

James, you first met Paul at Manchester Metropolitan University some years ago. Were you both studying on the same course? And have you always been friends?

I was at Manchester Metropolitan University studying contemporary arts while Paul was studying textile management. I had started experimenting with art on acrylic as an innovative canvas and decided to pursue this idea for my final year project.  Paul was also on the cusp of graduating; we were both very inspired by the idea of doing something for ourselves, and all that energy we had at university really inspired us to go for it.

Qubic Tax, acrylicize

I can only imagine! So where did the idea of acrylicize first come about? During University, or afterwards?

acrylicize started as my degree project. I was exploring the public’s perception of contemporary and conceptual art. I wanted to develop something that could be appreciated by a wide spectrum of people who weren’t involved in the art establishment so looked at doing something new with the simple ‘picture on the wall’ concept. The idea of acrylicize was to update the traditional canvas and develop a contemporary alternative using modern materials and technology. That’s where the use of acrylic came in and with it the name acrylicize.

How did you initially set up the business? What obstacles did you face and how did you overcome these?

For my final show at university, I displayed my acrylic art pieces with ornamental price tags designed to make a comment on Art as commodity and unintentionally sold every piece. I was always interested in building a brand around the work and just because my course finished I wasn’t ready for the project to end – really it was just the beginning. Paul then jumped on board with his sales skills and we essentially worked our arses off! It was actually one of the most exciting times of the whole last 10 years as everything was so new and exciting; we believed that anything was possible and it’s on those beliefs that we moved forward.

One of the main obstacles when starting any business from scratch is not having any previous work to show for ourselves. Looking back I think it was actually one of our biggest assets as we weren’t in any way conditioned by industry practices and as such just did whatever felt right, using our instinct and intuition to help make decisions. This freedom is one of the main factors in us staying true to ourselves and creating something genuinely unique.

In terms of a challenge, one of the most important things has always been to challenge ourselves to keep creating and evolving. This is how the idea of ‘Customism’ came about, creating completely unique, narrative-driven art concepts and installations for interior spaces, be it offices, hospitals or stadia. These projects took on different forms and utilised a whole host of materials and techniques.

Interiors Group, acrylicize

You began producing unique acrylic art, and now offer bespoke art installations, commissions, architectural features, interior graphics and exhibitions for businesses. What is your process when approaching a new project and seeing it through to completion?

With each project we take on, we put a huge amount of effort into the initial research. We focus on embracing the personality of a space and try to find a story to tell. Once we have this we have the essence of the work and we can then think about execution and how the story can be brought to life. These initial idea phases are done as a group in-house with everyone pitching in ideas, thoughts and suggestions etc. We have internal ‘stretch sessions’ where we challenge each other creatively, with individual and team tasks. This can involve everything from collecting train tickets for an afternoon at Paddington Station, to each going out to the supermarket to buy Heinz beans and experimenting at home.

We operate as artists, looking for the opportunity to try something new with every new commission. From the client’s perspective, they know never to expect the same thing twice.

Do you have specific creative individuals in the industry you go to for design ideas? Or is the work mostly done in-house?

Most of the work is done in-house at our Shoreditch studio. However, one thing we’re big advocates of at acrylicize is collaboration. We have a strong theme of collaboration and love working with other people to realise ideas.

On a recent project for long-term collaborators The Office Group, we teamed up with graphic designer Alex Fowkes. We had been admiring his work for Sony Music so dropped him a line and asked him to join us for The Office Group project at 7 Stratford Place, a Georgian townhouse that had a lot of cool history that we wanted to convey through our art. Alex was up for the project so we worked together on what is one of our favourite pieces to date.

The Office Group, 7 Stratford Place, acrylicize

How do you feel your work affects office spaces? Are there better levels of productivity for example?

Art has often been confined to the gallery space and we’re really interested in the opportunity to engage with artwork in any walk of life. The workspace is one of the places you spend the longest at, so why shouldn’t you have the ability to engage with art there? We live in such a visual society and we believe art can help to stimulate people. People also appreciate the idea that who they work for has invested in the space, creating an environment that makes you happy, a bit more vibrant and a bit more energetic. That goes a long way.

Research by Dr Craig Knight, from the psychology department at the University of Exeter, has shown that staff work 15 per cent more efficiently in an office decorated with art and plants. When staff decorated their own office space, productivity increased by 30 per cent.

You also work on residential, public and healthcare projects. Is the process very similar? And which do you prefer working on?

Sometimes more professional research is required, especially when working within healthcare. It’s always really rewarding working in this sphere as you know that work is doing something to help people who are in need of feeling better.

Heinz R&D HQ, Wall 57, acrylicize

You’ve worked with a variety of brands, including some huge names – Hilton, Emirates, Harrods, BBC to name just a few. Which has been the most enjoyable for you so far?

All have been great projects. Heinz was particular awesome it was a glorious story to bring to life and a huge project for us as a company. We got to travel to the Netherlands to create a feature wall that stands in the reception of their European Innovation Centre, where all the R&D happens. It was an honour to be a part of Heinz history.

And the most challenging?

When Newcastle-based accountants Qubic Tax came to us wanting to inspire their staff, we had a challenge on our hands. Lets face it Tax can be quite a dry subject and no one particularly loves the fact that they have to pay tax. Our solution was to create a canvas of over 1,200 LEGO figures, each one representing a tax-paying vocation. We were trying to make something that is genuinely quite hard and dislikeable into something that will put a smile on your face. We looked at tax and we really wanted to humanise it as much as we could. The use of Lego was used to soften that experience and tap into the child in you.

Heathrow T3, acrylicize

What are the most valuable lessons you have learnt from setting up your own business? Any advice for aspiring young entrepreneurs?

We put endless effort into making contacts, picking up the Yellow Pages and calling everybody, absolutely anybody, who may have been remotely interested in what we were doing. It’s all about action and the very act of doing something as simple as speaking to people has a knock-on effect.

For young entrepreneurs who are finding their feet, starting their own businesses, two principal themes have been very successful to us personally. The first one is a positive step. Take a step somewhere even if you are not sure which direction you’re going in. Don’t worry about that. The important thing is to be proactive, get off the couch and just take the first step to start you on your path and journey.

The second theme is belief. Have belief in yourself. Have belief in what you are offering and have belief in the people you are working with. Positive energy and belief are the two key drivers that we embrace and push forward every day.

Wembley Stadium , acrylicize

You seem to be constantly evolving and developing, so what is next for acrylicize?

We are really interested in the idea of community and collaboration and bridging the gap between great creative talent and opportunities to make a living doing what you love. We have some big plans in the department. On top of this we are developing some great projects as part of acrylicize and are about to release two short films about our recent installations that have just been completed.

And when you’re not busy installing monsters into the Headquarters of Mind Candy or injecting some fun into a tax office with Lego pieces, what else do you enjoy doing? Where would we find you on a typical weekend?

Paul and I both have young children so we are spending a lot of time with all the amazing things that come with that. I am also a keen drummer and graffiti artist and like to indulge in both these areas regularly. It’s all about balance and doing lots of what you enjoy.

Final question – what is your own office space like – just curious!

We’ve got a great space in Shoreditch, just off Redchurch Street. It’s got relics of all our projects and is a really bright, open space with huge floor to ceiling windows. We moved east two years ago, from our original studio in Harrow. The team had grown and we were keen to soak up the creativity of the melting pot that is east London at the current time. The energy is great, it’s a vibrant part of town filled with artists, designers and people doing their thing, creating a constantly evolving landscape on an almost daily basis. It suits what we do very well and we wanted to leave our mark.

The Office Group, 7 Stratford Place, acrylicize

Wheat is Wheat is… Wheat?

Posted on May 13, 2014 by Liz

It is clear that artist and designer Peddy Mergui has a desire to challenge the status quo in his creations, partly stemming from growing up amongst various cultures, in Morocco, Israel and Japan. He’s worked on a multitude of advertising campaigns and has helped to create brands worldwide, which only makes his latest venture all the more interesting.

Flour by Prada, Peddy Mergui

Wheat is Wheat is Wheat is Mergui’s first solo exhibition, about to open in San Francisco. In this series, he has taken the packaging of basic commodities (eggs, milk, butter, oil) and introduced high end brand names (think Gucci and Versace) into their labelling, providing them with a new identifying element. The resulting products are definitely food for thought as it were. Both individually and collectively, the striking images within the exhibition allow for open dialogue on consumer culture, ethical boundaries and the design world.

The connection between packaging and products is recognisable in modern culture, although not often logical. What would it mean to eat Tiffany&Co yoghurt or to make your morning coffee with Cartier coffee beans? Mergui’s pairings are playful and even amusing; drawing the viewer in and simultaneously challenging them with a provocative undertone. What kind of challenges do designers face in terms of economic interest versus integrity? As consumers, do we inadvertently support unethical conditions? Do we perceive certain brands as meaning we belong to a certain type of group, as a certain type of person?

Salami by Louis Vuitton, Peddy Mergui

Mergui found: “The interesting part is that most viewers tell me they see something they want in the exhibition. Why? Not for the playfulness of it, but for what it makes them feel. The Seduction presents us with a mirror to ourselves.”

iMilk by Apple, Peddy Mergui

Wheat is Wheat is Wheat definitely poses more questions than it answers and this is the most enjoyable aspect of the exhibition. It is a truly eye opening series that will inspire debate – and make you question your purchases on your next shopping trip!

Eggs by Versace, Peddy Mergui

What’s on at The Saatchi

Posted on May 8, 2014 by Liz

We truly love The Saatchi Gallery here at WIN – it’s a spectacular venue that shares thought provoking and inspiring contemporary art with the world, a global meeting place for all who visit and accessible for anyone and everyone as all exhibitions are free! We are extremely lucky as it is also where we will be holding our World Interiors News Annual Awards Dinner later this year, following the success of last year’s event (we can’t wait!). So what’s been going on at The Saatchi so far this year?

Kostas Agiannitis – Lifestyle. Image courtesy of the Saatchi Gallery

Firstly, an exciting partnership with Google+ has allowed for motion photography to be introduced as an art form for everyone. As technology continues to develop, photographers from all backgrounds are embracing new ways to tell their stories. Motion photography is a new trend that used to require special tools and know-how, but Google+ have simplified the process, allowing users to effortlessly and automatically animate a series of still photographs and turn them in to motion photography.

Matthew Clarke – Night. Image courtesy of the Saatchi Gallery

In recognition of the exciting potential of this new technology came the Motion Photography Prize, inviting photographers all over the world to celebrate this new creative art form, the first global entry competition of its kind. This was judged by an amazing panel of forward-thinkers including film director Baz Luhrmann and artists Shezad Dawood and Cindy Sherman. The competition was tough, with over 4,000 entries from 52 countries, but an overall winner was recently announced. Christina Rinaldi, with her black and white motion photograph of a New York window cleaner, has won a once-in-a-lifetime trip with a photographer or film-maker as her mentor. Her entry, along with those of the five other finalists, plus the shortlist of 54 motion photographs is now on exhibition at The Saatchi Gallery until 24 May and will also be featured online at Saatchi Art.

Christina Rinaldi – Urban. Image courtesy of the Saatchi Gallery

Another fantastic exhibition that is currently on display until 31 August, is Pangaea: New Art From Africa and Latin America. Taking its title from the prehistoric landmass that conjoined Africa and Latin America, this major survey reunites the two former sister continents by bringing together the work of 16 of their contemporary artists. The exhibition celebrates and explores the parallels between their distinctly diverse cultures and creative practices, as they begin to receive recognition in the increasingly globalised art world.

Aboudia – Enfants dans la rue 2, 2013. © Aboudia, 2013. Image courtesy of the Saatchi Gallery

The artists in Pangaea: New Art From Africa and Latin America, respond to present day complexities in diverse and innovative ways. Years of colonial rule, rapid urban expansion, migration and political and economic unrest remain subjects for many of the artists whose reflections on the richness of their environment translate into an intense visual experience. The full scope of work on display in this exhibition, which includes new painting, photography, installation and sculpture, encapsulates this sense of diversity – a bubbling energy surfacing in the two great continents that were once Pangaea.

Rafael Gómezbarros – Casa Tomada, 2013. © Sam Drake, 2014. Image courtesy of the Saatchi Gallery.

Pangaea: New Art From Africa and Latin America features work by Aboudia, Leonce Agbodjélou, Fredy Alzate, Antonio Malta Campos, Rafael Gómezbarros, David Koloane, José Lerma, Mário Macilau, Ibrahim Mahama, Dillon Marsh, Jose Carlos Martinat, Vincent Michea, Oscar Murillo, Alejandra Prieto Boris Nzebo, Christian Rosa. A stand out piece is definitely Gómezbarros’ Casa Tomada, with giant ants that address issues of diaspora and internal displacement suffered in Colombia for several decades due to the armed conflict wreaking havoc on the country. Aboudia’s vast canvases are also striking, occupied by a multitude of characters displaying menacing weapons, a record of the sudden escalation of violence following electoral chaos in the city of Abidjan in 2011.

Vincent Michea – Before the Bigger Splash, 2012. © Vincent Michea, 2012. Image courtesy of the Saatchi Gallery.

With all this on and more, it’s quite simple really – get yourself down to The Saatchi as soon as you can to experience some amazing art!

An Artist’s Impression: Loukas Morley

Posted on March 28, 2014 by Liz

Loukas Morley is a Cambridge based artist and designer who studied at Cambridge and the Newport School of Art in South Wales.

Azure Pink, 90×90 (spirit based pigment on canvas)

Loukas is extremely adventurous in his work and, not being bound by any one medium, could be described as an artist, furniture maker and even landscape gardener.

His strongest designs can be distinctly seen within his paintings, which we love. These grand canvases, many of which are over 1m2, would make the perfect finishing touch for any interior design scheme and could be easily placed as a feature in any room of the house. What is obviously distinct is his incredible use of colour, he merges tones in swirling patterns with impressive effects; his paintings have a great presence in large open spaces.

Wild Flowers From My Balcony, 100×100 (spirit based pigment on canvas)

Diptych I, 70×70 (spirit based pigment on canvas)

Summer Reverie, 70×70 (spirit based pigment on aluminium)

Seeing great value and beauty in disregarded objects, Loukas also rescues and re-uses materials that would have been otherwise thrown away within his work. He offers a somewhat poetic response to human wastefulness. This upcycling is very evident in his furniture, most of which has been constructed from reclaimed wood and metal. Loukas has designed and made tables, chairs, stools, and even bespoke storage for private clients.

Protoype Side Table (in production)

Reversible cedar table top on trestle legs, 2006, 80x250cm

The team at WIN are now coveting a piece to hang on the wall in our office – and we can’t wait to see what’s next from this talented artist!


The Fabric Prints of the Present (and Past!)

Posted on February 28, 2014 by Liz

Heal’s has a long and prominent history of discovering and nurturing creative talent. Back in the 1950s, the company was responsible for championing fabric designs by emerging designers of the time including Lucienne Day, Zandra Rhodes and Barbara Brown. So it is extremely exciting to hear that they have just produced an exclusive own-brand fabric collection, the first since the 1970s. As expected, they have worked with both established designers, including Rhodes, and also those who are lesser known. Each designer has created a unique pattern for Heal’s, resulting in a striking collection that celebrates both colour and individuality, drawing inspiration from fabric archives, decorative arts, nature and even jewellery.

Paul Vogel, Milo’s Stripe

Pia Benham, Heal’s Head of Fabric & Design comments: “As part of the relaunch of Heal’s historic fabric department, we wanted to extend our current fabric offering. We hope the new collection will help further strengthen our fabric department’s position as the destination for unique and exciting designs, a place that can inspire our customers and enable them to make their homes a beautiful place to live in. We also wanted to inject fun and excitement into our Heal’s fabric design once again, by working with established as well as emerging designers – in the same way we did in the 1950s and 1960s.”

Heal’s Journal with Peacock Flower print, Malika Favre

Also coinciding with the fabric collection launch comes a coordinating home accessory line, Heal’s 1810 – named after the year in which they were first established. This series features selected patterns from the new fabric range giving the opportunity for them to be appreciated in multiple ways throughout their customers’ living spaces. The accessories include kitchen textiles such as aprons, oven gloves and tea towels, as well furnishings such as cushions. It also includes stationary, for example cute journals that can be flaunted with pride outside of the home!

Zandra Rhodes, Top Brass 2

Onto the prints, of which there are an extensive and fabulous amount. Zandra Rhodes’ Top Brass 2 makes a return, having originally been designed for Heal’s in 1963. A reminder of the Pop Art period of the time, it has the designer’s signature pink colour palette with a medal motif inspired by a David Hockney painting. Another return is the late Diana Bloomfield’s Tea Time, which truly reflects the 1950s period in which it was first designed. Introduced with the help of Bloomfield’s daughter Julia, Tea Time has a retro style but the playful print allows for a modern feel. It is thought to be inspired by the illustrated cakes and jellies of Isabella Beeton’s Mrs Beeton’s Book of Household Management.

Heal’s Tray with Tea Time Print, Diana Bloomfield

Cressida Bell’s Trees is heavily influenced by the 1930s and 1940s, taking inspiration from illustrators of the period such as Eric Ravilious and Edward Bawden. Including rich colours and detailed pattern, it can clearly be seen that her design motto is ‘more is more’! Another bold print, Malika Favre’s geometric style Peacock Flower uses the form of the bird as the basis for her abstract pattern, having seen one wandering around her hotel on a recent trip to the French Riviera!

Cressida Bell, Trees

A simpler, but still extremely effective pattern is Paul Vogel’s Stripe series. This was inspired by Heal’s own archives but adapted using this Spring’s colour trends and by playing with proportions. Emily Patrick’s Cloud is based on one of her paintings, breaking down the barrier between outside and inside. Ottilie Stevenson looked to Art Deco jewellery to create the crisp geometrics of Zig Zag while Petra Börner’s Lady Jane is designed to resemble a scattered bouquet of rough cuts from the garden. Finally, a distinctively Scandinavian design from Hvass & Hannibal. Herbarium uses the forest as its main theme, with an illustrative and folkloristic style depicting plants, flowers and trees.

Hvass & Hannibal, Herbarium

The collection offers a style to suit every taste and is an amazing reflection of Heal’s, of its inspiring past and also of the current brand that we have grown to know and love. It really offers something for everyone, especially with the 1810 line and after thirty years, we at WIN believe the collection is a long-awaited triumph!