Category Archives: Interior design projects

The Fabric Prints of the Present (and Past!)

Posted on February 28, 2014 by Liz

Heal’s has a long and prominent history of discovering and nurturing creative talent. Back in the 1950s, the company was responsible for championing fabric designs by emerging designers of the time including Lucienne Day, Zandra Rhodes and Barbara Brown. So it is extremely exciting to hear that they have just produced an exclusive own-brand fabric collection, the first since the 1970s. As expected, they have worked with both established designers, including Rhodes, and also those who are lesser known. Each designer has created a unique pattern for Heal’s, resulting in a striking collection that celebrates both colour and individuality, drawing inspiration from fabric archives, decorative arts, nature and even jewellery.

Paul Vogel, Milo’s Stripe

Pia Benham, Heal’s Head of Fabric & Design comments: “As part of the relaunch of Heal’s historic fabric department, we wanted to extend our current fabric offering. We hope the new collection will help further strengthen our fabric department’s position as the destination for unique and exciting designs, a place that can inspire our customers and enable them to make their homes a beautiful place to live in. We also wanted to inject fun and excitement into our Heal’s fabric design once again, by working with established as well as emerging designers – in the same way we did in the 1950s and 1960s.”

Heal’s Journal with Peacock Flower print, Malika Favre

Also coinciding with the fabric collection launch comes a coordinating home accessory line, Heal’s 1810 – named after the year in which they were first established. This series features selected patterns from the new fabric range giving the opportunity for them to be appreciated in multiple ways throughout their customers’ living spaces. The accessories include kitchen textiles such as aprons, oven gloves and tea towels, as well furnishings such as cushions. It also includes stationary, for example cute journals that can be flaunted with pride outside of the home!

Zandra Rhodes, Top Brass 2

Onto the prints, of which there are an extensive and fabulous amount. Zandra Rhodes’ Top Brass 2 makes a return, having originally been designed for Heal’s in 1963. A reminder of the Pop Art period of the time, it has the designer’s signature pink colour palette with a medal motif inspired by a David Hockney painting. Another return is the late Diana Bloomfield’s Tea Time, which truly reflects the 1950s period in which it was first designed. Introduced with the help of Bloomfield’s daughter Julia, Tea Time has a retro style but the playful print allows for a modern feel. It is thought to be inspired by the illustrated cakes and jellies of Isabella Beeton’s Mrs Beeton’s Book of Household Management.

Heal’s Tray with Tea Time Print, Diana Bloomfield

Cressida Bell’s Trees is heavily influenced by the 1930s and 1940s, taking inspiration from illustrators of the period such as Eric Ravilious and Edward Bawden. Including rich colours and detailed pattern, it can clearly be seen that her design motto is ‘more is more’! Another bold print, Malika Favre’s geometric style Peacock Flower uses the form of the bird as the basis for her abstract pattern, having seen one wandering around her hotel on a recent trip to the French Riviera!

Cressida Bell, Trees

A simpler, but still extremely effective pattern is Paul Vogel’s Stripe series. This was inspired by Heal’s own archives but adapted using this Spring’s colour trends and by playing with proportions. Emily Patrick’s Cloud is based on one of her paintings, breaking down the barrier between outside and inside. Ottilie Stevenson looked to Art Deco jewellery to create the crisp geometrics of Zig Zag while Petra Börner’s Lady Jane is designed to resemble a scattered bouquet of rough cuts from the garden. Finally, a distinctively Scandinavian design from Hvass & Hannibal. Herbarium uses the forest as its main theme, with an illustrative and folkloristic style depicting plants, flowers and trees.

Hvass & Hannibal, Herbarium

The collection offers a style to suit every taste and is an amazing reflection of Heal’s, of its inspiring past and also of the current brand that we have grown to know and love. It really offers something for everyone, especially with the 1810 line and after thirty years, we at WIN believe the collection is a long-awaited triumph!

Paper Productions

Posted on February 18, 2014 by Liz

Pia Wüstenberg is a German born designer, who studied in the UK before moving to Finland to set up her studio piadesign. It is here that she began to explore self-production using local crafts skills. She has since returned to the UK and has continued in her explorations with international clients and brands, through collaborations and also ‘Utopia & Utility’, the design and manufacturing company set up by Pia and her brother Moritz.

Samples, Paper Productions Lights, Pia Wüstenberg

Paper Productions  is a collection of handcrafted lights created by artisans in Ahmedabad, India and the outcome of one of Pia’s collaborative development projects. On invite from House of MG, a hotel and lifestyle company in Ahmedabad, Pia spent six weeks working at the Khalamkush Paper Factory in India. The factory uses traditional paper making techniques, making its own paper pulp from cotton rags. In this way it is completely self-sufficient, both from the material making to the pressing and processing of the finished paper sheets.

Gunghat Light Cluster, Paper Productions Lights, Pia Wüstenberg

To create the Paper Productions lights, paper was draped and moulded onto various objects, many sourced from the vibrant old market in Ahmedabad. This includes balloons and funnels, creating different lamp shapes, all extremely delicate and lightweight. Some have an additional wire ornament, others are simply comprised of the paper shade, equipped with a small LED light.

Paper Making Station with Vaishali and Dimple, Paper Productions Lights, Pia Wüstenberg

The lights combine in clusters, creating a beautiful effect akin to that of jellyfish swimming underwater. There is beauty in their soft and graceful positioning and in the way they have been produced, and these are two key elements in Pia’s designs. She reinvents the use of materials, creating an object that stands for its present use but also the history behind its making. Pia believes that: “The contrast and overlap of these stories make up the life of the object, and are valued equally.”

Ful Light Cluster, Paper Productions Lights, Pia Wüstenberg

Paper Productions is not just a beautiful collection of lights, it tells a story of the tradition of paper making and the people in Ahmedabad. It will also continue to be made by the artisans Pia worked with and so it is important that the project is shared with a wider audience to promote their skills and provide continuing work. It will be showing at the Kraft Work Exhibition at the Aram Gallery in London and for WIN’s international readers and Pia’s other collections will also be shown at Design Shanghai and at EDIT by designjunction in Milan. We highly recommend going along, or just reading more about Pia’s brilliant work!

Ful Light Cluster, Paper Productions Lights, Pia Wüstenberg

Happy Birthday Bourgie!

Posted on February 4, 2014 by Liz

A lamp with an unmistakable style and a veritable Kartell best seller; Ferrucio Laviani’s Bourgie admirably combines classicism, richness and tradition with innovation and irony. With a Baroque style, a wide shade with plissé effect that sets up a myriad play of reflections when lit and an attachment that allows it to be raised or lowered by the user, this is a lamp that is all about transformation. It is a decorative desk lamp and simple living room lighting, a sculpture but also a reading lamp that lends itself to many uses and as such is itself a strong communicator. It is no surprise that with the coming of its tenth anniversary of being in production, the team at Kartell decided to do something special for Bourgie.

Kartell goes Bourgie by Patricia Urquiola

This birthday celebration to pay tribute to twenty years of collaboration with Laviani and ten years of Bourgie, whilst also sparking the creative minds of the brilliant designers at Kartell, called for the team to reinterpret the lamp in a new and fun way. The result is a collection of 14 versions that are currently part of a travelling exhibition. The lamp has in the short time from 2004 to the present become somewhat of a veritable design icon, a transversal and eclectic lamp that shines in any context from the contemporary to the classic. As such, it was the perfect product to play with for designers Patricia Urquiola, Piero Lissoni, Front, Mario Bellini, Alberto Meda, Lenny Kravitz, Philippe Starck, Eugeni Quitllet, Christophe Pillet, Nendo, Tokujiin Yoshioka, Patrick Jouin, Ludovica+Roberto Palomba and Rodolfo Dordoni. Together they pushed the boundaries of design and suggested alternative interpretations and executions.

Kartell goes Bourgie by Philippe Starck

Starck chose an ironic interpretation, decorating the lamp with costume jewellery and stereotypically French symbols such as The Eiffel Tower, while Pillet dressed it in an elegant all black dress of matte felt. Front suggested a sort of genetic mutation, heating up its front to reshape, creating a lamp that leans over your shoulder to give you light whilst you read.

Kartell goes Bourgie by Front

Urquiola disassembled Bourgie’s base and suspended its parts as a chandelier, deconstructing the lamp to reform it as a pendant light. Meanwhile, Bellini fashioned two into a standard lamp complete with coat hooks and umbrella stands. Nendo had a subversive take on the original, turning it upside down and rotating the silhouette, so that their two lamps together form a space that is the upside down Bourgie lamp. They also inverted the name, christening their sculptural piece ‘Eigruob’.

Kartell goes Bourgie by Nendo

Quitlett gave a gift of the traditional lamp base with a birthday cake on top, ten candles for the ten years of production. Clearly it can be seen that each designer has reimagined the lamp and given it character, creating a new personality whilst retaining its original and distinctive charm. Perhaps what best sums up this celebration of design is the message on Jouin’s lamp, which reads ‘The Future is a Present from the Past’. Laviani himself views the project as ‘a manifesto whose key message is that ideas, culture and the differences of others can render the work of an individual more interesting and contemporary.’

Kartell goes Bourgie by Patrick Jouin

Happy Birthday Bourgie – don’t forget to make a wish!

Kartell goes Bourgie by Eugeni Quitllet

Chair Wear: Add Style to your Seats

Posted on January 28, 2014 by Liz

With a unique twist on fashion, function and sustainability, Design Studio Bernotat&Co have created a collection of clothing for chairs, asking: Why buy a new chair when you can dress up the one you have? Having already begun dressing up chairs with their Triennal design for Gispen, the Studio realised they could look at upholstery as a completely separate item – the upholstery becomes the chair’s clothing. This clothing gives new life to chairs, restyling them for a completely different look. Cleverly, it also has the possibility to add comfort to hard wooden chairs or allow for simple chairs to have more purpose and functionality which is especially handy for workspace environments.

Photo Credit Marleen Sleeuwits and Rogier Chang

Several textiles were custom-made in cooperation with the Audax Textiel Museum in Tilburg which resulted in technical and functional innovations, such as three-dimensional knits. Others are found materials, used for an entirely different purpose than originally intended. The team began with an initial ‘Haute Couture collection’ before creating the ‘Prêt-à-Porter models’ which we’re going to have a look at below.

Pique-Pocket, Photo Credit Marleen Sleeuwits and Rogier Chang

Firstly, the Pique-Pocket. This model carries household as well as fashion connotations: the structure of the fabric and the detailing are reminiscent of an oven mitten or an apron, but at the same time it has a dainty colour and a waist-like fitting. The two pockets in the back provide an ideal place to store clutter such as phones or books, a great addition to a dining or reception chair – I’d love one at my desk at home personally!

Knit-Net, Photo Credit Marleen Sleeuwits and Rogier Chang

Secondly, the Knit-Net. The protective foam net packaging of expensive apples served as inspiration for this design, which adds comfort to a hard chair and is made of specially developed 3D knitwear. Essentially, it’s a chair cushion, but in a very different shape and technique. Also, thanks to the netted structure in combination with four press studs, Knit Net folds itself beautifully on any regular dining or reception chair, independent on the position of the legs.

Hoodini, Photo Credit Marleen Sleeuwits and Rogier Chang

Next we see Hoodini. This design was created with a knitted textile and looks a bit like a Chesterfield sofa, but also like granny’s dressing gown. The cover is truly multifunctional: useful as baggy storage space when hanging over the back of the chair and as a privacy screen when pulled over the sitter’s head like a hood. Absolutely perfect for hiding and having a private moment in a shared office – we all need that sometimes! – or in a busy household, away from the family for a brief second.

Big Baggy, Photo Credit Marleen Sleeuwits and Rogier Chang

Finally there is Big Baggy. Being Pique-Pocket’s big brother, Big Baggy takes the idea of pockets for chairs to a professional level: he has pockets for anything a nomadic worker might need. The back has two big pockets for newspapers and magazines, the left side is for electronic media: iPad, iPhone and a practical hanging loop for headphones. The left side has pen loops, a pocket for a ruler and two pockets for those other small bits that are usually scattered on your desk. The compact office redefined and a brilliant idea for freelance workers!

From looking at each model individually, it can be seen that they are more than just chair covers and also more than storage creators; they are ambiguous objects with various sources of inspiration and us such are open to associations and even personalities. Being slightly strange, some of them maybe even awkward, they trigger emotional reactions. People relate differently to the chairs when they’re dressed-up, and the chairs suddenly acquire a certain anthropomorphic quality. Funnily enough, the Dutch word for upholstery is ‘bekleding’ – its root including the word ‘clothing’, creating a direct relation to the human body.

Photo Credit Marleen Sleeuwits and Rogier Chang

Here at WIN we love them all, both individually and as a family, and excitingly Bernotat&Co are already working on new models! We can’t wait to see what quirky covers are to come and I’m sure you can’t either – watch this space.

Blacksheep and Jamie’s Italian collaborate for exciting international expansion

Posted on January 20, 2014 by Liz

Autumn 2013 saw Blacksheep,  the hospitality design and branding agency, unveil their latest designs for three brand new Jamie’s Italians in overseas Dubai, Singapore and Istanbul. Blacksheep have worked with the brand for four years and thus understood that they had to reflect the traditional and classic Jamie’s Italian concept, whilst also considering the cultures and customs unique to those regions, ensuring that local guests and holiday makers alike, can enjoy the true Jamie’s experience. The team’s success came from their ability to build close partnerships with local craftsman and artisans to ensure each restaurant could relate to its locality, whilst also remaining true to the unique Jamie’s brand.

Emma Freed, Interior Designer at Blacksheep commented: “The best thing about working on Jamie’s Italian for the international market, is the fact that they represent something fresh and new to those regions. In Singapore for example, although they are familiar with the brand, it is many people’s first time experiencing a Jamie’s. There is something very rewarding and special about the excitement and anticipation which surrounds these projects.”

Main dining area and feature dividing screen, Dubai

Blacksheep’s launch of their very first international collaboration with the household name, in the form of Jamie’s Italian, Jumeirah Beach Hotel Dubai, marks the strength in their relationship with Jamie’s as they move to expand the brand internationally. Situated within the Jumeirah Beach Resort, the prestigious location of the restaurant was to be key to the brief. With striking views to the iconic Burj Al Arab already framing the destination, the team enhanced this feature whilst embracing the existing architecture of the new build site. Blacksheep created a semi enclosed circular space within the centre of the restaurant to form an intimate dining experience, framed by metal screens with open and closed glass detail. The overall result provides the guest with privacy whilst also reminding them of the wider restaurant setting and beautiful views throughout.

Rear dining room with antipasti bar, Singapore

With Jamie’s Italian in Singapore, the key focus was on reclaimed and homely materials to contrast with the clean lines of the shopping centre environment of where it is situated in Vivo City, one of the region’s largest and busiest retail destinations. Blacksheep created a range of different dining spaces to fulfil the brief including an arbour, private dining area and outside terrace providing stunning views across the harbour. The entrance is key as it allows open views into the bar and deli area enticing passers-by, as well as drawing their eye to the central views of the terrace area beyond. Reclaimed timber beams and vintage reclaimed lighting are amongst the key materials used in this location.

Feature wine display, Instanbul

Jamie’s Italian in Zorlu shopping Centre Istanbul, undoubtedly challenged the Blacksheep team as it marks the biggest Jamie’s Italian the creative agency has designed to date. The team looked to create a different dining experience on each level. The ground level presents a daytime sanctuary and includes an antipasti bar and theatrical kitchen with an emphasis on colour and the building’s grand ceiling heights. The first level provides a more intimate dining experience whilst also remaining an accessible dining space for all. This area also includes a striking wine display, its very own antipasti bar as well as a pizza oven and private dining area for those wanting to experience the brand in the intimacy of their friends and family. The destination restaurant also offers two standalone terrace areas to enjoy the Jamie’s experience.

Arbour dining area with feature chandelier, Singapore

All three restaurants also include glazing which can be folded back at night-time allowing guests inside to enjoy the outside atmosphere, something which is popular amongst diners in such tropical climates. Blacksheep continue to work with the brand on developing new sites in 2014. The team at WIN look forward to seeing more translations of this UK favourite, both at home and in more exotic destinations!

WIN Awards now open!

Posted on January 10, 2014 by Liz

We’re delighted to announce that we have now opened the World Interiors News Annual Awards 2014, following phenomenal success in 2013. Recognising and promoting the designs that have made the biggest impact on the cultural landscape over the past year, the awards programme spans 13 categories covering a whole spectrum of interior design. Interior projects include Residential, Workspace, Retail, Restaurants, Bars, Hotels, Leisure or entertainment venues, Museum or exhibition spaces, Public sector, Workspace, and Lighting design. The Products section focuses on Lighting, Furniture and Interior Accessories.

Ranging from emerging designers to long-established ones, our Awards have attracted submissions from over 120 countries. Judged by some of the most distinguished figures in the design world – many of whom have gone on to collaborate with award recipients – this is a fantastic opportunity to showcase innovative designs and boost your commercial potential. Previous judges have included Sir Terence Conran, Lee Hallman (Foster & Partners), Mark Majors (Speirs & Major), Vanessa Brady (interiors Designer and President, SBID), and Rabih Hage (Architect & Interior Designer).

Entrants receive considerable media coverage to our global community of over 220,000 architects, designers, developers and clients. Plus, all winning and shortlisted entries will be published in a Special Winners issue of INSIDE, our monthly round-up of the latest news, views and issues from the world of interior design. Many of our past winners have testified that this exposure contributed significantly to their business success.

Entry is just £250, but register before 14 March and you’ll receive a generous 20% discount on your fee. The winner from each category will be announced later in the year at a ceremony – date to be confirmed.

So if your designs have advanced practice and helped push the boundaries of both beauty and ingenuity, enter our World Interiors News Annual Awards and see how we can transform your business.

For further information about the World Interiors News Annual Awards 2014 and full details on how to enter, contact Liz Naven liz.naven@worldinteriorsnews.com or call +44 (0)1273 201 117.

From Paris to Tokyo

Posted on December 19, 2013 by Megan

Diptyque, a textiles company founded by Christiane Montadre-Gautrot, Desmond Knox-Leet and Yves Coueslant, is the product of a shared dream: a boutique textile outlet combining their artistic collaborations, inventiveness and creativity.

In the early 1960s, 34 Saint Germain des Prés was a prestigious address; a hub for Parisians in search of creativity and new ideas. The shop had two windows, like a diptych, giving the boutique its name. Originally designers of beautiful cotton fabrics with striking patterns, these three arty friends also loved traditional or unusual objects, which they sought out all over the world. Very quickly, Diptyque became a “chic bazaar” that people flocked to in search of a departure from the norm.

Two years later, in 1963, the designers built upon the boutique’s unique ambience with the introduction of three scented candles. The scents of Thé, Cannelle and Aubépine, (Tea, Cinnamon and Hawthorn) helped the company establish itself as a leading name in the world of pure, natural fragrances.

Today the brand has a stronger industry presence than ever, including a store in Tokyo’s Aoyama district, where alternative, eclectic style is welcome.  In its Tokyo home, the Parisian spirit of Saint Germain pervades, but Diptyque has also been reinvented for the Japanese market. The ethos behind the company’s success, however, remains: rigorous selection of raw materials and the desire to learn, discover and reinvent. The designers continue to deliver ranges and collections which evoke a subtle blend of elegance and simplicity, just as they did in the early 1960s.

A combination of stone, wood, tatami, brass and warm colours give the Aoyama shop interior a friendly, intimate atmosphere, blending wood with flamboyant shades and bright essences. 550 candles form a tree trunk, acting as a shrine to fragrance. Dyptyque fabrics, in varying and unusual colour blends, form the backdrop to the iconic 34 Boulevard Saint Germain range, encapsulating the history and the spirit of the old Parisian days.

Amongst the collection are two limited edition lanterns designed by José Lévy, sealing the relationship between Paris and Tokyo. Levy worked with Japanese artisans to understand their relationship to light and produced an installation of a bed of 50 Diptyque candles for the city’s first night-time festival. Inspired by the gardens in each city, he proceeded to design two lanterns entitled “Tokyo” and “Paris”. Through their differing scents, each suggest elements of their respective city.

Aesthetically the lanterns are simple and contemporary, with a cream backdrop and clean black lines, making them a stylish accessory for any interior – they’re certainly on our Christmas Wish-list!

For more information about Diptyque and their ranges, visit www.diptyqueparis.com.

Celebrating at Saatchi

Posted on December 10, 2013 by Megan

Ten days on from the inaugural World Interiors News Annual Awards ceremony and dinner the winning designers are still basking in the glory of their successes. London’s Saatchi Gallery played host to the most distinguished figures in architecture and interior design, treating the attendees to an opportunity to view the latest exhibition entitled “Body Language” which explores the physicalities of human beings through photography, sculpture and painting.

Escaping the cold November night outside, over 300 guests from across the globe retreated into the gallery’s warmth for a cocktail reception, a 3-course meal and some all-important networking opportunities. Amongst the many well-known faces was judge and interior design guru Sir Terence Conran, who has been a keen supporter of the awards programme.

As petit-fours and coffee were served, the awards ceremony began with a speech from Annalisa Hammond, Editor of World Interiors News, welcoming the guests and introducing Art historian and BBC Culture Show host Andrew Graham-Dixon who proceeded to present the awards for the winning designs.

Whilst the shortlisted entries from each category were announced and the winners collected their trophies on stage, guests from all areas of architecture and interior design were reminded of the designs which have helped shape the material and cultural landscape over the past year.

When the ceremony came to a close, the elated winners and shortlisted designers were photographed with their trophies and certificates, and the champagne flowed as celebrations began.

After overwhelmingly positive feedback about the event, Annalisa Hammond reflects that “the intimacy and originality of the venue appealed to our sponsors and guests, many of whom have already enquired about next year’s event!”

With the 2014 Awards due to open in early January, it promises to be another exciting year ahead for World Interiors News.

Westin Palace

Posted on November 19, 2013 by Megan

Rockwell Group Europe have recently completed the interior design for the new event spaces at the historic Palace Hotel, Madrid. Originally designed by Catalan architect Ferrés i Puig, the internal event space within the 20th century building have been given a touch of modern elegance in a bid to revive the hotel’s longstanding role as a hub for Madrid civic life.

A total area of 1,185 sq m was transformed by Creative Director Diego Gronda and his team. Worthy of note within these designs are several custom lighting features, including an LED lighting system which allows users of the “Circulo Palace” to choose between more than 250 colours, to set the mood of the room at the touch of an I-pad.

The new venue, Espacio Palace, complements the hotel’s existing meeting rooms, providing a distinctive spatial and aesthetic alternative. “We developed a design language that is at once respectful of the 100-year history of this magnificent building, yet offers a contemporary interpretation and accommodates the technological needs of guests and customers of the 21st century,” says Gronda. “This project has been especially important to us because the hotel plays such a prominent role in the life of Madrid, and it’s our first commission in our home city.”

Rockwell Group Europe invented a sophisticated, multi-purpose space that is adaptable to amaximum of private functions, such as business presentations, cocktail parties, wedding celebrations, dinners, and ballroom dances. The design is intended to capture the essence of the glamorous “Palace Brasserie” that occupied this location in the early 20th century while imbuing the space with a modern sensibility and firmly anchoring it in our time. Inspired by the landmark Neptune Fountain in front of The Westin Palace, Rockwell Group Europe integrated subtle design references to water throughout the new venue, connecting the hotel’s interior to its urban context and adding a sense of movement to custom furniture, lighting, and carpeting. Neutral and metallic tones lend the spaces a fresh and contemporary feel.  

The project nearly doubles the hotel’s banqueting capacity, making The Westin Palace the largest luxury hotel supplier for special events in Madrid. It is the culmination of Rockwell Group Europe’s interior redesign of the hotel’s most significant public spaces, which began in 2012 with the renovation of the dramatic rotunda lobby and lounge, long known for its spectacular stained glass dome, as well as four of the hotel’s meeting rooms.

QE2 Hotel Design Proposal by Benoy

Posted on November 18, 2013 by Megan

Almost 50 years on from the launch of The QE2, design proposals are being put forward for the ship’s conversion into a floating 5-star hotel. Amongst the proposed plans is the scheme of award-winning designers Benoy, who propose a design preserving the original architecture and ambience of the world-famous vessel, uniting the character of the 60s with contemporary and cutting edge design trends. It is a scheme which propels the liner into the 21st century luxury market.

In the historically important spaces of the Midships Lobby and Queen’s Room, Benoy propose to conserve the forward-thinking intent of the original QE2 design by introducing modern variations on textiles, lighting, fittings and technology. 

Amongst the design challenges encountered during the early stages of planning was the issue of how to introduce light and physical space into the arteries of the ship, given the long, straight passenger corridors which run through the vessel. Benoy’s solution was to carve circular vestibules out along the passageways, providing opportunities to showcase art and feature lighting to open the space up.

Within the guest suites, the curved alterations of the corridors continue to flow through the spatial design, with subtle hints of a nautical theme. The luxurious ambience was crafted using highlights of marbled stone, stand-alone bath tubs and glass walls. The furnishings note the style of the QE2 history, with a vintage appeal that is accompanied by a natural and contemporary colour palette. 

The floating hotel will accommodate private residences, a conference centre, a performance theatre and ballroom, as well as retail and leisure locations. Benoy has accommodated space for a modern maritime museum, present the important and fascinating history and artefacts of the iconic vessel to both the public and hotel guests. Guests can experience an elevator ride to the top of the ship’s funnel, which has been re-designed as an observation platform. Above deck, the original swimming pool has been enlarged to accommodate 5-star standards.

John Denton, Director of Interior Design at Benoy, commented that the firm’s submission embraced the “history and philosophy” of the transatlantic ocean liner.

Benoy’s design concept film for the QE2 hotel can be found on the Benoy YouTube Channel.